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Getting your friend a job

An award-winning team of journalists, designers, and videographers who tell brand stories through Fast Company's distinctive lens. Leaders who are shaping the future of business in creative ways. New workplaces, new food sources, new medicine--even an entirely new economic system. Having friends at work is a significant predictor of workplace happiness. But there are times when it can be a drawback as well—particularly when you and one of your friends are vying for the same promotion. When you think about it, this situation is pretty likely at some point in your career, assuming you have friends who are in similar roles and at similar career stages.

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How to Recommend a Friend for a Job

Keep your friendship and integrity intact when interviewing someone you know. Alina is sorting through applications for a job on her team when she realizes that Gary, a good friend from another department, has applied.

Just as she's wondering how to respond, Gary calls and asks her to "put in a good word" for him. Alina feels conflicted. She doesn't want to give her friend false hope, or disadvantage the other candidates.

She's also keen to avoid any potential accusations of favoritism from other team members. In this article, we explore the benefits and pitfalls of interviewing a friend, and look at seven tips for doing so that protect your relationship and your integrity. Interviewing someone who you know well — a friend, an old colleague or a family member, for instance — brings with it a unique set of challenges.

For example, his or her behavior and comments during the interview could reflect well or badly on you. Also, you need to interview objectively, but the pressure of "doing the right thing" could lead you to overcompensate for his weaknesses or to downplay his strengths, unfairly disadvantaging or boosting his chances of success. If you do hire a friend this could lead to other potential problems.

For example, your team members may feel she was hired simply because she knows you well. Also, there may be speculation or rumor that you offered her a higher salary, as research shows can happen when friends hire friends.

Interview your friend in the right way, however, and it could be a fantastic win—win situation. If you then hire your friend after a process that was transparent and fair, you'll have a supportive, competent new team member who fits the role and your organization. Remember, your focus must be on giving every candidate a fair and equal chance.

Always act ethically and legally in your recruitment process. When you discover that you'll be interviewing someone who you know, speak up. Tell your human resources department, and seek legal advice if appropriate.

In some situations, interviewing a friend could be seen as a significant conflict of interest, or may not even be permitted by your organization. Be honest about how you know him, how long you've been friends, and how close your relationship is. The demands of work and friendship can be contradictory consider the possible awkwardness of having to manage — and perhaps discipline — your friend.

So, it may be wise to step aside if you have any doubt about your ability to remain balanced and impartial during the interviewing process. If you do choose to be involved in the interview, don't conduct it alone. Ask a colleague to attend, as well as a HR representative if one is available , to ensure an impartial viewpoint.

If you walk into the interview room and realize that you know the interviewee, take a moment to think about the situation, and decide how you want to proceed. If possible, remove yourself from the interview for a few minutes and discuss the situation with a member of HR or a colleague. At the start of the interview, explain what will happen during the recruitment process, what your role will be, how interviewees will be scored and assessed, and who will make the final decision.

Stating this information upfront makes everyone aware of the work-placed boundaries and their respective responsibilities. This will help keep the process objective and fair. If in doubt, always seek a second opinion. For example, you might "just know" that your friend would be perfect for the role, even though she has never worked in your industry before.

Hence, you overlook her weaknesses and hire her. Or, your friend may have great potential but you focus on her poor timekeeping outside of work and dismiss her chances before the interview even begins. Openly acknowledge the unusual circumstances at the start of the interview, as it's likely to be unfamiliar and perhaps uncomfortable for everyone involved.

Doing so will likely reduce tension and avoid a possible unfair evaluation of your friend. Interviewing someone you already have a relationship with can present some ethical dilemmas.

For instance, your friend could say something that you know is untrue — do you speak up? Or, if he fails to mention something positive about his work history, should you say something on his behalf? So, consider in advance how you would act if an ethical dilemma were to arise.

Just as you would for any other interview, remember what tasks the interviewee will need to fulfill, and why you're hiring for the role in the first place. What do you want that person to achieve? Familiarizing yourself with your organization's mission and goals, too, will also help you to interview objectively, and fully focus on what any potential employee needs to offer.

If your friend is successful, you need to ensure that she is treated fairly by you and other team members upon appointment. Explain that you will assess your friend by the same measures and reviews as everyone else. You also need to be prepared to tell your friend that they didn't get the job. Interviewing a friend for a job comes with particular risks.

For example, the "weirdness" of the situation could cause tension and even derail the interview. However, the potential "wins" of interviewing a friend make it a challenge worth tackling. Decide whether to even participate in the process. It may be wise to step aside if you have any doubt about your ability to remain impartial. Establish boundaries, and explain what will happen during the recruitment process and who will make the final decision. Remember your long-term objectives and keep in mind what tasks the interviewee will need to fulfill.

If your friend is successful, create a positive narrative about her, to counter any suspicions of favoritism. This site teaches you the skills you need for a happy and successful career; and this is just one of many tools and resources that you'll find here at Mind Tools. Subscribe to our free newsletter , or join the Mind Tools Club and really supercharge your career!

Expert Interviews Audio Forums Infographics. Quizzes Templates and Worksheets Videos. For Your Organization. Note: Remember, your focus must be on giving every candidate a fair and equal chance. Tip: If you walk into the interview room and realize that you know the interviewee, take a moment to think about the situation, and decide how you want to proceed.

Tip: Openly acknowledge the unusual circumstances at the start of the interview, as it's likely to be unfamiliar and perhaps uncomfortable for everyone involved. Tip 1: You also need to be prepared to tell your friend that they didn't get the job. Key Points Interviewing a friend for a job comes with particular risks.

When interviewing a friend, declare the nature of your relationship immediately. Examine your biases and if in doubt, always seek a second opinion. Consider in advance how you would act if an ethical dilemma were to arise. Add this article to My Learning Plan.

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I don’t want to recommend my friend for a job

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This unfortunate situation can be hard for everyone involved. It can also be an opportunity for you to step in and help them get a job.

If your friend fires off a job referral for you—and then you decline the job offer —it could put you on shaky ground with your buddy. Not to mention, if you do find a flexible job that you love in the future, your friend might not be so quick to make a second or third referral for you. So make sure that the job is really one that you want before enlisting others to help you close the deal and get hired. Find out how this company treats referrals. Maybe they have an incentive program e.

Why You Shouldn’t Be So Quick To Refer A Friend For A Job

In many cases, having an existing employee pass along your resume or support your candidacy is a surefire ticket to having a resume reviewed, so your friend is smart to ask for your help. Agree to help your friend, but make a lukewarm referral. Even just passing along the resume puts you in the position of helping a non-qualified person access your employer, and you could look bad if it does not work out. Choose this option at your own risk and keep in mind: a lukewarm referral may do more harm than good. Will the commute be really long? Is the salary too low? Will the work environment be ill-suited to her? Be clear about the negatives about the organization as they relate to her working at the same company as you and discourage her from applying. Come up with an excuse. Help re-direct your friend to a different company or industry.

How to Handle a Friend Asking for a Job at Your Work

An award-winning team of journalists, designers, and videographers who tell brand stories through Fast Company's distinctive lens. Leaders who are shaping the future of business in creative ways. New workplaces, new food sources, new medicine--even an entirely new economic system. These days, it seems like a job referral is the only way a candidate can land an offer from a dream company.

What if we were coworkers?

By commenting, you agree to Monster's privacy policy , terms of use and use of cookies. Home Workplace Workplace Issues. The Pros and Cons of a Referral.

5 ways to help your unemployed friend get a job

Recommending a friend for a job can be a positive, beneficial experience, providing the friend is qualified and a good candidate for the position. This type of personal recommendation does have the potential to get tricky, however, if you don't have full confidence in your friend's abilities or you feel pressured into making the introduction. Many companies encourage their employees to recommend friends or former colleagues for positions in the organization.

Keep your friendship and integrity intact when interviewing someone you know. Alina is sorting through applications for a job on her team when she realizes that Gary, a good friend from another department, has applied. Just as she's wondering how to respond, Gary calls and asks her to "put in a good word" for him. Alina feels conflicted. She doesn't want to give her friend false hope, or disadvantage the other candidates.

Should You Recommend Friends At Work?

Do you have a friend or family member who is looking for a new job? What can you do for them? Whether the person is looking for a better opportunity or has lost their job, there are many different ways you can assist them with their job search. When someone loses his or her job, it can be very stressful. There are some extra things you can do to make life a little easier for someone who is out of work, worried about money, and in the middle of a job hunt.

May 29, - They pay the referring employees a bonus when their friends get hired. A well-designed and well-executed employee referral program is a.

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7 Things to Consider Before You Ask a Friend for a Job Referral

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How to Interview a Friend for a Job

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Comments: 4
  1. Mokora

    And on what we shall stop?

  2. Tataur

    I consider, that you commit an error. I can prove it. Write to me in PM, we will talk.

  3. Nanos

    It is very a pity to me, I can help nothing to you. But it is assured, that you will find the correct decision. Do not despair.

  4. Junris

    Yes, I understand you. In it something is also to me it seems it is very excellent thought. Completely with you I will agree.

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