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How much sleep does a teenager need each night

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Most teens need about 8 to 10 hours of sleep each night. Getting the right amount of sleep is important for anyone who wants to do well on a test or play their best in sports. Unfortunately, many teens don't get enough sleep. Teens often got a bad rap for staying up late, oversleeping for school, and falling asleep in class. But teen sleep patterns are different from those of adults or younger kids.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How Much Sleep Should Your Teen be Getting?

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Teen Sleep Problems and Heart Disease Risk

How Much Sleep Do I Need?

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Lack of sleep can make it harder for your child to behave well, regulate emotions, pay attention and do well at school, and get along with others. Being tired all the time can even contribute to mental health issues like anxiety and depression. Most teenagers need hours of sleep each night. Some need as little as 7 hours or as much as 11 hours. This is because they start to secrete melatonin later at night than they did in earlier childhood, which affects their circadian rhythms.

Also, as their brains mature during puberty, children can stay awake for longer. Good daytime habits can help your teenage child get the sleep he needs, especially as he gets towards the later teen years.

These habits can also help your child avoid or sort out any sleep problems that come up. You can be a healthy sleep role model for your child — for example, by winding down before bed, reducing screen-time before bed, relaxing and managing stress, and reducing your use of stimulants like caffeine before bedtime. Signs that your teenage child has sleep problems might include difficulties with:. If your child has sleep problems, she might also feel tired during the day, or have trouble remembering things or concentrating.

Your child might be able to solve some sleep problems by getting into the good sleep habits described above. If your child has sleep problems, she needs to be involved in solving her own sleep issues. Then he might be able to choose a daytime or evening habit that he thinks will help. If this is the case with your child, you might need to talk about it. Young people should avoid alcohol and illegal drug use completely. These substances have a bad impact on sleep, mental health and wellbeing.

Skip to content Skip to navigation. Why teenagers need sleep Your teenage child needs sleep to: maintain a healthy body keep her immune system working well maintain good mental health boost her energy levels, learning and concentration store things in her long-term memory.

About teenage sleep needs and patterns Most teenagers need hours of sleep each night. Helping teenagers get the sleep they need Good daytime habits can help your teenage child get the sleep he needs, especially as he gets towards the later teen years. Sleep environment Encourage your child to avoid the use of electronic devices in the hour before bed. Ask your child to put his electronic devices in family rooms overnight. A quiet, dimly lit space is important for good sleep.

Good health and nutrition Make sure your child has a satisfying evening meal at a reasonable time. Feeling hungry or too full can make it harder to get to sleep. Encourage your child to get as much natural light as possible during the day, especially in the morning. This will help her body produce melatonin at the right times in her sleep cycle. Make sure your child has a healthy breakfast to kick-start his body clock.

This helps the body feel ready for sleep at night. Encourage your child to avoid caffeine — in energy drinks, coffee, tea, chocolate and cola — especially in the late afternoon and evening. Encourage your child to do some physical activity during the day, but not too late at night. Worries, fears and anxiety If your child has worries that keep her awake at night, try talking about them together during the day.

Encourage your child to write down anxious thoughts each day well before bedtime. For each thought, your child could also add a possible solution.

Suggest your child tries some mindfulness exercises to calm his anxious or active mind before sleep. Signs that your teenage child has sleep problems might include difficulties with: getting to sleep staying asleep getting out of bed in the morning. Working with your child on sleep problems If your child has sleep problems, she needs to be involved in solving her own sleep issues.

Sleep in Adolescents

Lack of sleep can make it harder for your child to behave well, regulate emotions, pay attention and do well at school, and get along with others. Being tired all the time can even contribute to mental health issues like anxiety and depression. Most teenagers need hours of sleep each night. Some need as little as 7 hours or as much as 11 hours.

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Adolescents are notorious for not getting enough sleep. Teenagers do not get enough sleep for a number of reasons:. Shift in sleep schedule. It also means waking 2 hours later in the morning.

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Sleep is food for the brain. During sleep, important body functions and brain activity occur. Skipping sleep can be harmful — even deadly, particularly if you are behind the wheel. You can look bad, you may feel moody, and you perform poorly. Sleepiness can make it hard to get along with your family and friends and hurt your scores on school exams, on the court or on the field. For example, drowsiness and falling asleep at the wheel cause more than , car crashes every year. Most high school students need an alarm clock or a parent to wake them on school days. They are like zombies getting ready for school and find it hard to be alert and pay attention in class. Because they are sleep deprived, they are sleepy all day and cannot do their best. Schools that have set later bell times find that students do not go to bed later, but get one hour more of sleep per school night, which means five hours more per week.

Teenagers and sleep

Children and adolescents who do not get enough sleep have a higher risk for many health and behavior problems. Learn how much sleep students need and how many are not getting it. Children and adolescents who do not get enough sleep have a higher risk of obesity, diabetes, injuries, poor mental health, and problems with attention and behavior. How much sleep someone needs depends on their age. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine has recommended that children aged 6—12 years should regularly sleep 9—12 hours per 24 hours and teenagers aged 13—18 years should sleep 8—10 hours per 24 hours.

Wendy Hall does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Victorian government portal for older people, with information about government and community services and programs. Type a minimum of three characters then press UP or DOWN on the keyboard to navigate the autocompleted search results. Sleep research suggests that a teenager needs between eight and 10 hours of sleep every night. This is more than the amount a child or an adult needs.

Sleep in Middle and High School Students

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If you answered yes to any of these questions, you are not alone. Many teenagers feel that they are always tired. Sleep helps to fuel your brain and your body. Teens need more sleep because their bodies and minds are growing quickly. Scientific research shows that many teens do not get enough sleep. Often the reason is obvious, such as too many late nights in a row.

Teens and sleep: Why you need it and how to get enough

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Teens need about 8 to 10 hours of sleep each night. But you might not be getting it. Here's why - and tips for getting more shut-eye.

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