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Love birds girl and boy

It's Valentine's Day. Love is in the air for some, at least. Without further ado. Mating begins with courtship behavior, and can continue throughout their roughly year lifespans. Monogamy is essential to the social stability of flocks and underlies much of their social behavior.

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How to Identify Male and Female in Lovebirds

How to know if you have a male or female Lovebird

Sometimes the motivation for adopting a lovebird is really to adopt two so you can have a pair. If you want two birds so they can keep each other company, it's not necessary to have one of each gender. But if you want them to have baby lovebirds, you need to know how to tell a male from a female to guarantee you have what it takes to get babies. Some breeds of lovebirds are sexually dimorphic, meaning that the males and females have obvious differences in their physical characteristics.

In Madagascar lovebirds, for instance, a male has a gray head and neck while the female is completely green, no gray markings at all. Another example is the red-faced lovebird. The males of this type are the ones with the red faces, while the females' faces tend to be more orange than red. Male red-faced lovebirds have light blue on their hind-ends and have black flight wings.

Some types of lovebirds look exactly alike, male and female. Lovebirds like the masked lovebird, the peach-faced lovebird and Fischer's lovebird are nearly impossible to tell one gender from the other. If you have a pair of identical lovebirds, your vet can help figure out if you have one of each or a truly matched single-gender set.

The easiest and least stressful way to determine the gender of a lovebird is through a blood test. Your vet will take a small sample of blood from your birds and send them to a lab for DNA testing that determine which chromosomes are present. Another way is for your avian vet to do a surgical examination of your birds' reproductive system. Since birds' sex organs are inside their bodies, the vet will have to anesthetize your birds and make an incision to insert an optical fiber to take a look inside.

Maybe you're simply curious about the genders of your lovebirds and it really doesn't matter to you what they are. If that is the case, there's no need to traumatize your birds with a surgical procedure or take blood from them to test their DNA. You can always look at telltale physical characteristics and behavior to make a guess.

In many monomorphic birds, the females are just a bit larger than the males, and sometimes the females' beaks are larger. A clue you can't miss is that females are the only ones who lay eggs. They also are more aggressive and territorial. Female lovebirds will chew up nesting material like paper and stash it in the feathers near the derriere to carry to the nesting site.

Some males chew up nesting material, but they don't tuck it away in their feathers. Elle Di Jensen has been a writer and editor since She began working in the fitness industry in , and her experience includes editing and publishing a workout manual. She has an extended family of pets, including special needs animals. Jensen attended Idaho and Boise State Universities.

Her work has appeared in various print and online publications. By using the site, you agree to the uses of cookies and other technology as outlined in our Policy, and to our Terms of Use. Skip to main content. Video of the Day. Brought to you by Cuteness.

Sometimes You Can Sometimes You Can't Some types of lovebirds look exactly alike, male and female. The Vet Can Help If you have a pair of identical lovebirds, your vet can help figure out if you have one of each or a truly matched single-gender set.

Clues Maybe you're simply curious about the genders of your lovebirds and it really doesn't matter to you what they are. References 3 Lovebirds; Matthew M. Author Elle Di Jensen has been a writer and editor since

14 Fun Facts About Lovebirds

Lovebirds are lively, adventurous birds that make great companions. When choosing your bird, look for a well-adjusted bird that is used to human interaction. Additionally, look for signs of health when choosing your lovebirds, such as well-formed toes, healthy-looking feathers, and a beak clear of discharge.

Sometimes the motivation for adopting a lovebird is really to adopt two so you can have a pair. If you want two birds so they can keep each other company, it's not necessary to have one of each gender. But if you want them to have baby lovebirds, you need to know how to tell a male from a female to guarantee you have what it takes to get babies.

How to know if you have a male or female Lovebird Knowing if you have a male or female lovebird is essential when it comes to raising it properly. In addition to helping you choose the. Knowing if you have a male or female lovebird is essential when it comes to raising it properly. To determine whether it is a male or female Lovebird, you can watch some physical or behavioral aspects.

How to Tell Male From Female Lovebirds

Lovebirds can be wonderful and endearing pets. They tend to have cute chatter and beautiful coloring, in addition to being very social creatures. However, most species that are kept as pets cannot be easily sexed. If you are interested in getting some lovebirds, but don't want them to breed, it is important that you figure out their sex before you put them in the same cage. If you don't, you could end up with more birds than you expected or wanted. The best and most conclusive way to find out a lovebird's sex is to get a blood testing kit, which you can buy online. If you want to examine the bird yourself, hold it upside down in your non-dominant hand with its head pointing away from you. Next, use the fingers of your dominant hand to gently feel the pelvic bones through the feathers and skin. Since females need wider pelvic regions to pass eggs, you can compare the pelvises of several birds to figure out which ones are female. To learn more about using blood testing kits, read on!

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gender of a lovebird, not as absolutes. * The female will sit on a perch with her legs spread further apart than the male. * Hens tend to be sturdier.

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Comments: 4
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  3. Brataur

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  4. Tygotaxe

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